Arctic: Sea-Ice Concentration/Extent

Animation shows daily Arctic sea ice extents for 2007, 2012, 2020, and 2022. The decadal averages are also included for the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s. Plot updated through 10/3/2022.
Latest Arctic sea ice extent (JAXA ADS AMSR2) updated through 10/3/2022.
Current Arctic sea ice extent (NSIDC, DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18) in addition to climatology (blue, 1981-2010) and 2 standard deviations from the mean (updated 10/3/2022)
Arctic sea ice extent anomalies for each year from 1979 to 2022 (satellite-era; NSIDC, DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS). Anomalies are calculated using a 5-day running mean from a climatological baseline of 1981-2010. 2021 is highlighted with a yellow line. 2022 is shown using a red line (updated 10/3/2022).
Arctic sea ice extent anomalies stretching from January 1979 to present day (satellite-era; NSIDC, DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS). Anomalies are calculated using a 5-day running mean from a climatological baseline of 1981-2010 (updated 10/3/2022).
Annual sea ice extent over the Arctic Ocean Basin (Beaufort, Chukchi, East Siberia, Laptev, and Central Arctic Seas) for 2022 (red line) and throughout the satellite era (purple [1979] to white [2021] lines). Plot updated 10/3/2022 using NSIDC Sea Ice Index v3 (DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18).
Current regional Arctic sea ice extents (NSIDC Sea Ice Index v3 : DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18) for 2022 (red line) and for each year through the satellite era (blue [1979] to white [2021] lines). 2012 is shown with a yellow line. A map of the regions can be found at https://zacklabe.files.wordpress.com/2022/08/b203f-nsidc_mapseas.png. Graphic updated 10/3/2022.
Daily sea ice extent along the Siberian Coast (i.e., East Siberian, Laptev, and Kara Seas) for 2022 (red line) and throughout the satellite era (purple [1979] to white [2021] lines). Plot updated 10/3/2022 using NSIDC Sea Ice Index v3 (DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18).
Current regional Arctic sea ice extents (NSIDC Sea Ice Index v3 : DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18) in addition to 2 standard deviations from the 1981-2010 mean. A map of the regions can be found at https://zacklabe.files.wordpress.com/2022/08/b203f-nsidc_mapseas.png. Graphic updated 10/3/2022.
Change in Arctic sea ice extent over the last 5 day for each marginal sea (NSIDC Sea Ice Index v3 : DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS F-18) (updated 10/3/2022).
A look at the cumulative change in Arctic sea ice extent for September 2022 (JAXA AMSR2). Updated through 10/3/2022.
Latest change in daily Arctic sea ice extent for 2022 (JAXA AMSR2). Plot updated through 10/3/2022.
Latest daily Arctic sea ice extent (JAXA AMSR2) for 2022. Mean sea ice extents from the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s decades are also shown by the dashed lines. A thin white line is shown for 2012. Yearly minimum extents (2002-2021) are shown by the scatter points with color in reference to the total sea ice extent. Updated 10/3/2021.
Latest daily Arctic sea ice extent (JAXA AMSR2) for 2022. Mean sea ice extents from the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, and 2010s are also shown by the dashed lines. Yearly maximum extents (2003-2021) are shown by the scatter points with color in reference to the magnitude. Updated 5/1/2022.
Current Arctic sea ice extents (JAXA AMSR2) from 2003-present. Color bars are blue when 2022 has dropped below the prior year. Updated through 10/3/2022.
Time-evolving accumulation of Arctic sea ice extent anomalies beginning each season on September 15th and ending in one year. Data are shown for seasons of 1979-1980 to 2022-2023 (satellite-era; NSIDC, DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS). Anomalies are calculated using a 5-day running mean from a climatological baseline of 1981-2010. Note that 2020-2021 is highlighted with a yellow line, 2021-2022 is highlighted with an orange line, and 2022-2023 is shown using a red line (updated 10/3/2022).

My visualizations:

  • Arctic Sea Ice Extent and Concentration
  • Arctic Sea Ice Volume and Thickness
  • Arctic Temperatures
  • Antarctic Sea Ice Extent and Concentration
  • Climate model projections compared to observations in the Arctic
  • Global Sea Ice Extent and Concentration
  • Polar Climate Change Figures
  • Climate Viz of the Month

  • My related research

    [12] Timmermans, M.-L. and Z.M. Labe (2022). [The Arctic] Sea surface temperature [in “State of the Climate in 2021”]. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., DOI:10.1175/BAMS-D-22-0082.1
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    [Press Release]

    [11] Labe, Z.M. and E.A. Barnes (2022), Comparison of climate model large ensembles with observations in the Arctic using simple neural networks. Earth and Space Science, DOI:10.1029/2022EA002348
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    [Plain Language Summary]

    [10] Timmermans, M.-L. and Z.M. Labe (2021). Sea surface temperature [in “Arctic Report Card 2021”], NOAA, DOI:10.25923/2y8r-0e49
    [HTML][BibTeX][Code]
    [Press Release]

    [9] Timmermans, M.-L. and Z.M. Labe (2021). [The Arctic] Sea surface temperature [in “State of the Climate in 2020”]. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., DOI:10.1175/BAMS-D-21-0086.1
    [HTML][BibTeX][Code]
    [Press Release]

    [8] Peings, Y., Z.M. Labe, and G. Magnusdottir (2021), Are 100 ensemble members enough to capture the remote atmospheric response to +2°C Arctic sea ice loss? Journal of Climate, DOI:10.1175/JCLI-D-20-0613.1
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    [Plain Language Summary][CLIVAR Research Highlight]

    [7] Timmermans, M.-L. and Z.M. Labe (2020). Sea surface temperature [in “Arctic Report Card 2020”], NOAA, DOI:10.25923/v0fs-m920
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    [Press Release]

    [6] Timmermans, M.-L., Z.M. Labe, and C. Ladd (2020). [The Arctic] Sea surface temperature [in “State of the Climate in 2019”], Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., DOI:10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0086.1
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    [Press Release]

    [5] Labe, Z.M., Y. Peings, and G. Magnusdottir (2020). Warm Arctic, cold Siberia pattern: role of full Arctic amplification versus sea ice loss alone, Geophysical Research Letters, DOI:10.1029/2020GL088583
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    [Plain Language Summary][CBS News][Science Magazine][The Washington Post]

    [4] Thoman, R.L., U. Bhatt, P. Bieniek, B. Brettschneider, M. Brubaker, S. Danielson, Z.M. Labe, R. Lader, W. Meier, G. Sheffield, and J. Walsh (2020): The record low Bering Sea ice extent in 2018: Context, impacts and an assessment of the role of anthropogenic climate change [in “Explaining Extreme Events of 2018 from a Climate Perspective”]. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc, DOI:10.1175/BAMS-D-19-0175.1
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    [Press Release]

    [3] Labe, Z.M., Y. Peings, and G. Magnusdottir (2019). The effect of QBO phase on the atmospheric response to projected Arctic sea ice loss in early winter, Geophysical Research Letters, DOI:10.1029/2019GL083095
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    [2] Labe, Z.M., Y. Peings, and G. Magnusdottir (2018), Contributions of ice thickness to the atmospheric response from projected Arctic sea ice loss, Geophysical Research Letters, DOI:10.1029/2018GL078158
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    [Plain Language Summary][Arctic Today]

    [1] Labe, Z.M., G. Magnusdottir, and H.S. Stern (2018), Variability of Arctic sea ice thickness using PIOMAS and the CESM Large Ensemble, Journal of Climate, DOI:10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0436.1
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    [Plain Language Summary]


    All of the Python code used to generate these figures are available from my GitHub account. Most scripts use data sets that are generated via ftp retrieval.

    *These figures may be freely distributed (with credit). Information about the data can be found on my references page and methods page.